Special Vaccination Packages for 50+

 

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FLU Vaccine

Influenza (“flu”) is a contagious disease that spreads every winter. However, in tropical countries, people can get the flu all year round. Flu is caused by influenza viruses, and is spread mainly by coughing, sneezing, and close contact. Anyone can get flu, but the risk of getting flu is highest among children. Symptoms come on suddenly and may last several days. They can include:

  • fever/chills
  • sore throat
  • muscle aches
  • fatigue
  • cough
  • headache
  • runny or stuffy nose

 

Flu can make some people much sicker than others. These people include young children, people 65 and older, pregnant women, and people with certain health conditions — such as heart, lung or kidney disease, nervous system disorders, or a weakened immune system. Flu vaccination is especially important for these people, and anyone in close contact with them. Flu can also lead to pneumonia, and make existing medical conditions worse. It can cause diarrhea and seizures in children.

Flu vaccine is the best protection against flu and its complications. Flu vaccine also helps prevent spreading flu from person to person.

Alternative treatment

You are getting an injectable flu vaccine, which is either an “inactivated” or “recombinant” vaccine. These vaccines do not contain any live influenza virus. They are given by injection with a needle, and often called the “flu shot.”

Flu viruses are always changing. Each year’s flu vaccine is made to protect against 3 or 4 viruses that are likely to cause disease that year. Flu vaccine cannot prevent all cases of flu, but it is the best defense against the disease.

It takes about 2 weeks for protection to develop after the vaccination, and protection lasts several months to a year. Some illnesses that are not caused by influenza virus are often mistaken for flu. Flu vaccine will not prevent these illnesses. It can only prevent influenza. Some inactivated flu vaccine contains a very small amount of a mercury-based preservative called thimerosal. Studies have shown that thimerosal in vaccines is not harmful, but flu vaccines that do not contain a preservative are available.

Some people should not get this vaccine

  • If you have any severe, life-threatening allergies. If you ever had a life-threatening allergic reaction after a dose of flu vaccine, or have a severe allergy to any part of this vaccine, including (for example) an allergy to gelatin, antibiotics, or eggs, you may be advised not to get vaccinated. Most, but not all, types of flu vaccine contain a small amount of egg protein.
  • If you ever had Guillain-Barré Syndrome (a severe paralyzing illness, also called GBS). Some people with a history of GBS should not get this vaccine. This should be discussed with your doctor.
  • If you are not feeling well. It is usually okay to get flu vaccine when you have a mild illness, but you might be advised to wait until you feel better. You should come back when you are better.

Risk and side effect of treatment

With a vaccine, like any medicine, there is a chance of side effects. These are usually mild and go away on their own.

Problems that could happen after any vaccine:

  • Brief fainting spells can happen after any medical procedure, including vaccination. Sitting or lying down for about 15 minutes can help prevent fainting, and injuries caused by a fall. Tell your doctor if you feel dizzy, or have vision changes or ringing in the ears.
  • Severe shoulder pain and reduced range of motion in the arm where a shot was given can happen, very rarely, after a vaccination.
  • Severe allergic reactions from a vaccine are very rare, estimated at less than 1 in a million doses. If one were to occur, it would usually be within a few minutes to a few hours after the vaccination.

Mild problems following inactivated flu vaccine:

soreness, redness, or swelling where the shot was given

  • hoarseness
  • sore, red or itchy eyes
  • cough
  • fever
  • aches
  • headache
  • itching
  • fatigue

If these problems occur, they usually begin soon after the shot and last 1 or 2 days.

Moderate problems following inactivated flu vaccine:

  • Young children who get inactivated flu vaccine and pneumococcal vaccine (PCV13) at the same time may be at increased risk for seizures caused by fever. Ask your doctor for more information.
  • Tell your doctor if a child who is getting flu vaccine has ever had a seizure.
  • Inactivated flu vaccine does not contain live flu virus, so you cannot get the flu from this vaccine. As with any medicine, there is a very remote chance of a vaccine causing a serious injury or death.

 

Instruction before and after treatment /procedure

Look for anything that concerns you, such as signs of a severe allergic reaction, very high fever, or behavior changes. Signs of a severe allergic reaction can include hives, swelling of the face and throat, difficulty breathing, a fast heartbeat, dizziness, and weakness. These would start a few minutes to a few hours after the vaccination

 

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Td or Tdap Vaccine

Tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis can be very serious diseases, even for adolescents and adults. Tdap vaccine can protect us from these diseases.

  • TETANUS (Lockjaw) causes painful muscle tightening and stiffness, usually all over the body. It can lead to tightening of muscles in the head and neck so you can’t open your mouth, swallow, or sometimes even breathe. Tetanus kills about 1 out of 5 people who are infected.
  • DIPHTHERIA can cause a thick coating to form in the back of the throat. It can lead to breathing problems, paralysis, heart failure, and death.
  • PERTUSSIS (Whooping Cough) causes severe coughing spells, which can cause difficulty breathing, vomiting and disturbed sleep. It can also lead to weight loss, incontinence, and rib fractures. Up to 2 in 100 adolescents and 5 in 100 adults with pertussis are hospitalized or have complications, which could include pneumonia or death.

These diseases are caused by bacteria. Diphtheria and pertussis are spread from person to person through coughing or sneezing. Tetanus enters the body through cuts, scratches, or wounds.

Alternative treatment

Tdap vaccine can protect adolescents and adults from tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis.

  • One dose of Tdap is routinely given at age 11 or 12. People who did not get Tdap at that age should get it as soon as possible. Tdap is especially important for health care professionals and anyone having close contact with a baby younger than 12 months.
  • Pregnant women should get a dose of Tdap during every pregnancy, to protect the newborn from pertussis. Infants are most at risk for severe, life-threatening complications from pertussis.
  • A similar vaccine, called Td, protects from tetanus and diphtheria, but not pertussis. A Td booster should be given every 10 years. Tdap may be given as one of these boosters if you have not already gotten a dose. Tdap may also be given after a severe cut or burn to prevent tetanus infection.
  • Tdap may safely be given at the same time as other vaccines.

Some people should not get this vaccine

  • If you ever had a life-threatening allergic reaction after a dose of any tetanus, diphtheria, or pertussis containing vaccine, OR if you have a severe allergy to any part of this vaccine, you should not get Tdap. Tell your doctor if you have any severe allergies.
  • If you had a coma, or long or multiple seizures within 7 days after a childhood dose of DTP or DTaP, you should not get Tdap, unless a cause other than the vaccine was found. You can still get Td.
  • Talk to your doctor if you: – have epilepsy or another nervous system problem, – had severe pain or swelling after any vaccine containing diphtheria, tetanus or pertussis, – ever had Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS), – aren’t feeling well on the day the shot is scheduled.

Risk and side effect of treatment

With any medicine, including vaccines, there is a chance of side effects. These are usually mild and go away on their own, but serious reactions are also possible.

Brief fainting spells can follow a vaccination, leading to injuries from falling. Sitting or lying down for about 15 minutes can help prevent these. Tell your doctor if you feel dizzy or light-headed, or have vision changes or ringing in the ears.

Mild problems following Tdap

(Did not interfere with activities)

  • Pain where the shot was given (about 3 in 4 adolescents or 2 in 3 adults)
  • Redness or swelling where the shot was given (about 1 person in 5)
  • Mild fever of at least 100.4°F (up to about 1 in 25 adolescents or 1 in 100 adults)
  • Headache (about 3 or 4 people in 10)
  • Tiredness (about 1 person in 3 or 4)
  • Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, stomach ache (up to 1 in 4 adolescents or 1 in 10 adults)
  • Chills, body aches, sore joints, rash, swollen glands (uncommon)

Moderate problems following Tdap

(Interfered with activities, but did not require medical attention)

  • Pain where the shot was given (about 1 in 5 adolescents or 1 in 100 adults)
  • Redness or swelling where the shot was given (up to about 1 in 16 adolescents or 1 in 25 adults)
  • Fever over 102°F (about 1 in 100 adolescents or 1 in 250 adults)
  • Headache (about 3 in 20 adolescents or 1 in 10 adults)
  • Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, stomach ache (up to 1 or 3 people in 100)
  • Swelling of the entire arm where the shot was given (up to about 3 in 100).
  • Severe problems following Tdap

(Unable to perform usual activities; required medical attention)

  • Swelling, severe pain, bleeding and redness in the arm where the shot was given (rare).
  • A severe allergic reaction could occur after any vaccine (estimated less than 1 in a million doses).

Instruction before and after treatment /procedure

Look for anything that concerns you, such as signs of a severe allergic reaction, very high fever, or behavior changes. Signs of a severe allergic reaction can include hives, swelling of the face and throat, difficulty breathing, a fast heartbeat, dizziness, and weakness. These would start a few minutes to a few hours after the vaccination.

 

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Pneumococcal Vaccine

Pneumococcal disease is caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteria. Anyone can get pneumococcal disease, but some people are at greater risk than others:

  • People 65 years and older
  • The very young People with certain health problems
  • People with a weakened immune system
  • Smokers

Pneumococcal disease can lead to serious infections of the:

  • Lungs (pneumonia),
  • Blood (bacteremia), and
  • Covering of the brain (meningitis).

Pneumococcal pneumonia kills about 1 out of 20 people who get it. Bacteremia kills about 1 person in 5, and meningitis about 3 people in 10. People with the health problems described in Section 3 of this statement may be more likely to die from the disease.

There are two kinds of pneumococcal vaccines available:

  • Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine or PCV13
  • Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine or PPSV23

Alternative treatment

  • All adults 65 years of age and older.
  • Anyone 2 through 64 years of age who has a long-term health problem such as:

– heart disease

– lung disease

– sickle cell disease

– diabetes

– alcoholism

– cirrhosis

– leaks of cerebrospinal fluid or cochlear implant

  • Anyone 2 through 64 years of age who has a disease or condition that lowers the body’s resistance to infection, such as:

– Hodgkin’s disease

– lymphoma or leukemia

– kidney failure

– multiple myeloma

– nephrotic syndrome

– HIV infection or AIDS

– damaged spleen, or no spleen

– organ transplant

 

  • Anyone 2 through 64 years of age who is taking a drug or treatment that lowers the body’s resistance to infection, such as:
    • long-term steroids
    • certain cancer drugs
    • radiation therapy
  • Any adult 19 through 64 years of age who:
    •  is a smoker
    • has asthma

Risk and side effect of treatment

  • Anyone who has had a life-threatening allergic reaction to the vaccine should not get another dose.
  • Anyone who has a severe allergy to any component of a vaccine should not get that vaccine. Tell your doctor if you have any severe allergies.
  • Anyone who is moderately or severely ill when the shot is scheduled may be asked to wait until they recover before getting the vaccine. Someone with a mild illness can usually be vaccinated.
  • While there is no evidence that pneumococcal vaccine is harmful to either a pregnant woman or to her fetus, as a precaution, women with conditions that put them at risk for pneumococcal disease should be vaccinated before becoming pregnant, if possible.

What are the risks from pneumococcal vaccine?

  • About half of people who get the vaccines have mild side effects, such as redness or pain where the shot is given.
  • Less than 1% develop a fever, muscle aches, or more severe local reactions.
  • A vaccine, like any medicine, could cause a serious reaction. But the risk of a vaccine causing serious harm, or death, is extremely small.

 

Instruction before and after treatment /procedure

Look for anything that concerns you, such as signs of a severe allergic reaction, very high fever, or behavior changes. Signs of a severe allergic reaction can include hives, swelling of the face and throat, difficulty breathing, a fast heartbeat, dizziness, and weakness. These would start a few minutes to a few hours after the vaccination.

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Zoster Vaccine

Shingles, also known as zoster or herpes zoster, is a painful skin rash resulted from being repeatedly infected with the same virus that causes chickenpox, Varicella-Zoster Virus (VZV). Anyone who has had chickenpox or received chickenpox vaccine in the past may develop shingles, which can result in development of painful blisters, sores and rashes on the skin.

After recovering from chickenpox, VZV still remains within the infected body, locating along the end of the nerve pathways. When the body’s immune system is weakened, the virus can multiply resulting in development of herpes zoster attack. Shingles will only occur along the nerve pathways and will not spread to the rest of the body due to the existing immunity against the virus. Common nerve pathways usually infected with VZV are around the hip, coccyx, eyes and face. A person with weak immune system such as an elderly, long term use of immunosuppressive medications such as steroids, having leukemia or Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndromes (AIDS) has higher risk of developing shingles.

Alternative treatment

  • Adults 50 years and older who get live shingles vaccine should receive 1 dose, administered by injection. Shingles vaccine may be given at the same time as other vaccines.

Some people should not get this vaccine

  • A person who has ever had a life-threatening or severe allergic reaction to gelatin, the antibiotic neomycin, or any other component of herpes zoster vaccine.
  • A person who has a weakened immune system because of:
    • HIV/AIDS or another disease that affects the immune system,
    • treatment with drugs that affect the immune system, such as steroids,
    • cancer treatment such as radiation or chemotherapy, or
    • cancer affecting the bone marrow or lymphatic system, such as leukemia or lymphoma.
  • Women who are or might be pregnant. Women should not become pregnant until at least 4 weeks after getting herpes zoster vaccine.

Some people should check with their doctor about whether they should get this vaccine,

Tell your doctor if the person getting the vaccine:

  • Has had an allergic reaction after a previous dose of live shingles vaccine or varicella vaccine, or has any severe, life-threatening allergies.
  • Has a weakened immune system.
  • Is pregnant or thinks she might be pregnant.
  • Is currently experiencing an episode of shingles. In some cases, your health care provider may decide to postpone shingles vaccination to a future visit. People with minor illnesses, such as a cold, may be vaccinated. People who are moderately or severely ill should usually wait until they recover before getting live shingles vaccine

Risk and side effect of treatment

  • Redness, soreness, swelling, or itching at the site of the injection and headache can happen after live shingles vaccine.
  • Rarely, live shingles vaccine can cause rash or shingles. People sometimes faint after medical procedures, including vaccination.
  • Tell your doctor if you feel dizzy or have vision changes or ringing in the ears. As with any medicine, there is a very remote chance of a vaccine causing a severe allergic reaction, other serious injury, or death

Instruction before and after treatment /procedure

An allergic reaction could occur after the vaccinated person leaves the clinic. If you see signs of a severe allergic reaction (hives, swelling of the face and throat, difficulty breathing, a fast heartbeat, dizziness, or weakness), call 9-1-1 and get the person to the nearest hospital.

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Varicella Vaccine

Chickenpox (also called varicella) is a common childhood disease. It is usually mild, but it can be serious, especially in young infants and adults.

  • It causes a rash, itching, fever, and tiredness.
  • It can lead to severe skin infection, scars, pneumonia, brain damage, or death.
  • The chickenpox virus can be spread from person to person through the air, or by contact with fluid from chickenpox blisters.
  • A person who has had chickenpox can get a painful rash called shingles years later. Chickenpox vaccine can prevent chickenpox.
  • Most people who get chickenpox vaccine will not get chickenpox. But if someone who has been vaccinated does get chickenpox, it is usually very mild. They will have fewer blisters, are less likely to have a fever, and will recover faster.

Alternative treatment

Routine

  • Children who have never had chickenpox should get 2 doses of chickenpox vaccine at these ages:
  • 1st Dose: 12–15 months of age
  • 2nd Dose: 4–6 years of age (may be given earlier, if at least 3 months after the 1st dose)
  • People 13 years of age and older (who have never had chickenpox or received chickenpox vaccine) should get two doses at least 28 days apart.

Catch-up

  • Anyone who is not fully vaccinated, and never had chickenpox, should receive one or two doses of chickenpox vaccine. The timing of these doses depends on the person’s age. Ask your doctor.
  • Chickenpox vaccine may be given at the same time as other vaccines.

Note: A “combination” vaccine called MMRV, which contains both chickenpox and MMR vaccines, may be given instead of the two individual vaccines to people 12 years of age and younger.

Some people should not get chickenpox vaccine or should wait.

  • People should not get chickenpox vaccine if they have ever had a life-threatening allergic reaction to a previous dose of chickenpox vaccine or to gelatin or the antibiotic neomycin.
  • People who are moderately or severely ill at the time the shot is scheduled should usually wait until they recover before getting chickenpox vaccine.
  • Pregnant women should wait to get chickenpox vaccine until after they have given birth. Women should not get pregnant for 1 month after getting chickenpox vaccine.

Some people should check with their doctor about whether they should get chickenpox vaccine, including anyone who:

  • Has HIV/AIDS or another disease that affects the immune system
  • Is being treated with drugs that affect the immune system, such as steroids, for 2 weeks or longer
  • Has any kind of cancer
  • Is getting cancer treatment with radiation or drugs
  • People who recently had a transfusion or were given other blood products should ask their doctor when they may get chickenpox vaccine.

Risk and side effect of treatment

A vaccine, like any medicine, is capable of causing serious problems, such as severe allergic reactions. The risk of chickenpox vaccine causing serious harm, or death, is extremely small. Getting chickenpox vaccine is much safer than getting chickenpox disease. Most people who get chickenpox vaccine do not have any problems with it. Reactions are usually more likely after the first dose than after the second.

Mild problems

  • Soreness or swelling where the shot was given (about 1 out of 5 children and up to 1 out of 3 adolescents and adults)
  • Fever (1 person out of 10, or less)
  • Mild rash, up to a month after vaccination (1 person out of 25). It is possible for these people to infect other members of their household, but this is extremely rare.

Moderate problems

  • Seizure (jerking or staring) caused by fever (very rare).
  • Severe problems
  • Pneumonia (very rare)

Other serious problems, including severe brain reactions and low blood count, have been reported after chickenpox vaccination. These happen so rarely experts cannot tell whether they are caused by the vaccine or not. If they are, it is extremely rare.

Note: The first dose of MMRV vaccine has been associated with rash and higher rates of fever than MMR and varicella vaccines given separately. Rash has been reported in about 1 person in 20 and fever in about 1 person in 5. Seizures caused by a fever are also reported more often after MMRV. These usually occur 5–12 days after the first dose.

Instruction before and after treatment /procedure

Look for anything that concerns you, such as signs of a severe allergic reaction, very high fever, or behavior changes. Signs of a severe allergic reaction can include hives, swelling of the face and throat, difficulty breathing, a fast heartbeat, dizziness, and weakness. These would start a few minutes to a few hours after the vaccination.

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